In most cases, judges choose to award joint custody to divorcing couples. This is because kids are best served when they have healthy and loving relationships with both parents. That’s not to say that there aren’t benefits to having sole custody, especially when there are certain issues at play when you’re getting a divorce. 

First of all, parents should understand there are two different types of custody parents can apply for. Physical custody refers to where a child spends most of his or her time. For example, parents with joint custody will typically have their children for the same amount of time each year. Legal custody refers to who makes decisions on behalf of the child. These decisions tend to related to essential matters, like healthcare and schooling. 

When a parent has sole legal custody, he or she isn’t legally required to consult the other parent when making major decisions. While this can make your decision-making process easier, it may also prevent you from receiving helpful insight when faced with difficult decisions. In this case, you may consider discussing matters with your former spouse, even if you’re largely responsible for making decisions on your own. 

In the event you share custody with a person who is unreliable or inconsistent, gaining sole custody can make you and your child’s life much easier. In this case, you won’t be obligated to consult the other spouse as a formality when you make an important decision on behalf of your child. It will also spare your child the pain of waiting for a parent who is largely absent or uninterested in providing love and support. If you’re unhappy with your current child custody arrangement, the first step is to consult with your family law attorney to make the best possible decisions.